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The Blues Scales by Dan Greenblatt: The Ultimate Resource for Jazz Musicians



The Blues Scales: Essential Tools for Jazz Improvising by Dan Greenblatt




If you are interested in learning how to improvise jazz solos using the blues scales, you might want to check out the book The Blues Scales: Essential Tools for Jazz Improvising by Dan Greenblatt. This book is designed to help beginners quickly learn how to create meaningful solos without having to first master all the scales and chords of a tune. It also provides advanced examples and transcriptions of solo phrases by famous jazz musicians such as Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and more. In this article, we will review what are the blues scales, what is the book The Blues Scales by Dan Greenblatt, and how to get the most out of it.




The Blues Scales Dan Greenblatt Pdf 17


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What are the blues scales and why are they important for jazz improvisation?




The blues scales are a type of pentatonic scales that have an added note, usually a flattened fifth or a sharpened fourth. There are two main types of blues scales: the major blues scale and the minor blues scale. The major blues scale is derived from the major scale by adding a flattened third, while the minor blues scale is derived from the minor pentatonic scale by adding a flattened fifth. For example, in the key of C, the major blues scale is C-D-Eb-E-G-A-C, and the minor blues scale is C-Eb-F-Gb-G-Bb-C.


The blues scales are important for jazz improvisation because they are simple, versatile, and expressive. They can be used over a variety of chords and progressions, especially those that have a bluesy or dominant sound. They can also create tension and resolution by using chromatic notes or blue notes that clash or resolve with the chord tones. Moreover, they can convey different moods and emotions depending on how they are played, such as sadness, joy, anger, or humor.


The major and minor blues scales




The major and minor blues scales have different characteristics and applications. The major blues scale has a bright and happy sound that works well over major chords, dominant seventh chords, or major seventh chords. It can also be used over minor chords by shifting it up a minor third. For example, over a Cm7 chord, you can use an Eb major blues scale. The major blues scale can also be mixed with other scales such as the mixolydian mode or the bebop dominant scale to create more variety and interest.


The minor blues scale has a dark and sad sound that works well over minor chords, minor seventh chords, or dominant seventh chords with a flattened ninth. It can also be used over major chords by shifting it down a minor third. For example, over a Cmaj7 chord, you can use an A minor blues scale. The minor blues scale can also be mixed with other scales such as the dorian mode or the bebop minor scale to create more variety and interest.


How to use the blues scales over different chords and progressions




One of the advantages of using the blues scales for jazz improvisation is that they can fit over many different chords and progressions without having to change scales too often. However, this also means that you have to be careful not to sound too repetitive or boring by playing the same notes over and over again. Here are some tips on how to use the blues scales effectively over different chords and progressions:



  • Use different patterns, rhythms, articulations, dynamics, and accents to create contrast and interest.



  • Use different octaves, registers, directions, intervals, and leaps to create variety and movement.



  • Use different approaches, enclosures, passing tones, neighbor tones, anticipations, delays, skips, slides, bends, vibrato, etc. to create tension and resolution.



  • Use different combinations of notes from the blues scale and notes from other scales or modes to create color and harmony.



  • Use different phrases that start or end on different notes from the blues scale or notes from other scales or modes to create melody and structure.



Examples of blues scale phrases by famous jazz musicians




One of the best ways to learn how to use the blues scales for jazz improvisation is to listen to and transcribe solos by famous jazz musicians who use them frequently. You can also analyze their phrases and see how they apply the tips mentioned above. Here are some examples of blues scale phrases by famous jazz musicians:



Musicians


Songs


Phrases


Miles Davis


All Blues


G Gb F Eb D G Gb F Eb D G Gb F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C Bb A G F Eb D C


Charlie Parker


Blues for Alice


F E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E Db Ab Db E


John Coltrane


Mr P.C.


C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C# E# F# G# A# C B Ab Gb Eb Db B Ab Gb Eb Db B Ab Gb Eb Db B Ab Gb Eb Db B Ab Gb Eb Db


Dave Sanborn


Bang Bang


G Ab Bb B Db Eb Ab Bb B Db Eb Ab Bb B Db Eb Ab B Db Eb Ab B Db Eb Ab B Db Eb Ab


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